hetariablogger:

source

permission to upload was given by artist~

shugazing:

dukkharupa:

Fuck russian cursive.

HOW WOULD YOU EVEN READ THIS

officialwhitegirls:

bitch just said no homo to a fictional snail

captainimaginary:

mapsontheweb:

Which country last (successfully) invaded you?

Love that Sweden gets just a questionmark like “what? it’s all good?”

ask-omnipony:

cheskasmagicshire:

nerthos:

geoffsayshi:

krystvega:

The African Renaissance Monument in Senegal, larger that the Eiffel tower and the statue of liberty .. Things you don’t see in mainstream media.
@KrystVegaNeteru

This is beautiful.

I think this picture better illustrates the size of that monument.

I never even knew this existed this makes me so happy to find out about it

yesss my birth country

alphabitches:

alphabitches:

what’s the difference between a tea bag and the English football team??

a tea bag lasts longer in a cup

kathenstoet:

Definitely one of my old pieces.
I tweaked it a little to my fit my taste. The unedited version was UGH.
Calabria, Italy has beautiful traditional costumes. ( * A * )

fayheyhey:

he really thought that would work

avajae:

Querying is a tough, sometimes soul-crushing business—and writing a query letter can in many ways be the most difficult part. After all, being asked to condense your 60-100k (or more?) manuscript into a page-long letter that makes your book sound intriguing and also personalizes to that specific agent with the teeny tiny stakes of the agent reading your manuscript (or not)? It’s ridiculously tough.

I’ve read my fair share of query letters over the years, and with the WriteOnCon query critique forums still fresh in my mind, I thought now as good a time as ever to write about five things you don’t need in your query.

  1. Explanation of the lessons the reader/your characters will learn. I understand the impulse to include this, I do—English teachers have told us for years that a book isn’t really literary gold unless it has some grand, over-arching, bigger than thyself message. But here’s the thing—even if your book does have that kind of message (and, um, you know what it is?), it’s best to leave it out of your query letter. 

    Now, I can already hear what you’re thinking (apparently my online self is a telepath)—but Ava, I worked so hard to get those messages into my book—why wouldn’t I talk about them? The why is pretty simple actually: 99% of the time writers include the message or lesson the characters or readers (or both) are going to learn when reading their book in their query letter, it sounds preachy—and worse, it sounds like your manuscript is preachy (or teacher-y, which isn’t any better), which leads to a ginormous no thank you. 

    I know that seems a little unfair. It’s totally possible that you have messages in your book that aren’t preachy at all and are woven really nicely into the story, and if that’s the case, that’s great, it really is. But don’t mention it in your query if you don’t want someone to assume your book is going to be preachy/teachy. 

  2. Vague phrases. I actually wrote a whole post about why details are so important in queries and pitches, so I won’t rehash the whole thing, but in queries, vague phrases are you enemy. Mentioning your protagonist’s dark secret or life-changing quest or how they meet a mysterious stranger or will have to make alife-altering choice whose consequences will affect all of humanity? Yeah, it’s not helpful. 

    The thing is, agents and editors read thousands of queries a year. They have books getting pitched to them all the time and the only way you’re going to pique their interest is if you show them how your book is unique. If your query is full of vague phrases, not only can I guarantee they’ve seen someone else (or many many many someone elses) describe their manuscript the same exact way, but you’re completely missing out on a vital opportunity to show them how your book stands out from the crowd. 

  3. Quotes from your manuscript. I did this in my first ever query (spoiler: it so didn’t work), and it’s something I’ve seen especially amongst new writers. 

    Again, I get the temptation: you’ve worked so very hard on your manuscript and you want to share some gems with the agent/editor in the hopes that it’ll pique their interest. But the query is not the place to show off your writing (or at least, not the writing of your manuscript)—the query is the place to explain your manuscript in a condensed, interesting way to make the reader want to learn more (and hopefully read) your book. 

    But Ava, you’re thinking (boy, telepathy is fun), this super amazing quote isn’t in the first sample that I’m attaching to the query letter. What if they don’t see my really awesome quote because they don’t read enough? Well, my friend, I’m going to share a little tough love: if they don’t read far enough to get to your super awesome quote it’s because a) it wasn’t for them b) your query wasn’t strong enough to represent your manuscript or c) your manuscript wasn’t ready. 

    Leave the quotes for the actual manuscript. Your query is not the place for them. 

  4. A huge bio. Let me start off by saying that bios are definitely important—and a vital part of the query. However, the focus of the query letter should absolutely be on your manuscript. Not you. 

    Your bio should be a few sentences to a paragraph long. That’s it. And that paragraph, quite frankly, really doesn’t need to take up all that much space. 

    Agents don’t need to know that you worked on this book for four years. They don’t need to know that your mom thought it was the best book she ever read, or that you won that online poetry award, or that you’ve known since kindergarten that you were meant to be a writer. All that should be in your bio are publishing or manuscript-related credentials (i.e.: you’re writing a medical drama and you’re a surgeon, or you’ve published short stories in The Glimmer Train, etc.). If you don’t have publishing credentials, that’s totally okay! Just say it’s your first book (or, you know, don’t? There’s some debate on this point) and let your manuscript do the talking (no debate on that one). 

  5. Anything in either of thesetwo posts. Self-explanatory, really. For your sake, (and the agents’ sakes) don’t do anything in those posts. Please. 

What would you add to the list?

mixestomix:

I redrew the still image from the final episode of Free! Eternal Summer and animated it~

I’M SO HAPPY MAKOHARU IS ENDGAME (‘∀’●)♡ I WILL NEVER SHIP ANYTHING AS HARD AS THIS QAQ

I really wish they actually animated this scene though

I’ve also made an animation for the Snowy Day Makoharu track

WHAT IF WE GET A MAKOHARU IN TOKYO TRACK IN THE NEXT DRAMA CD?!? WHAT IFFFFF?!?!

fem-usa:

my-bloody:

Pixiv ID: 5206200
Member: NANA-SHI

This is actually cannon. Prussia runs a blog (which hasn’t been updated since 2009) 

In it he states that him and America went to the beach and had a race in the ocean. America won and Prussia remarked that America “is fast like a shark”. 

doctorwho:

Forever reblog.

hetalianforever:

悪友が倒せない!!
Pixiv ID: 7271571
Member: マサラ
permission to post was given by the artist!

gramercyk35:

No one ever said EMTs were mature

mi tesoro~!